Wrecked Car Damaged Vehicle Blog

Is your vehicle a NTL non-total loss

Joseph Coupal - Friday, April 12, 2013

Most people are familiar with the term "total loss" and if you are fortunate, you've never had one! The insurance claim game has changed however as third world demand for vehicle parts, damaged & inoperative vehicles and raw metals have given insurance carriers a way to reduce their claims settlement expense on total losses. Because they can sell your wrecked vehicle for top dollar, they are more inclined to total it and pay you fair market value. For a more in depth explanation on the total loss decision process see http://damagemax.com/value.htm#panel-1.

So what is a Non-Total Loss (NTL)? It's pretty simple…any vehicle with an insurance claim that does not meet the state mandated total loss threshold. This will include damaged vehicles, theft recoveries, hail, flood & fire damaged units, storm damaged vehicles, etc. These units will generally be drivable, but also include units with damage that are far beneath the total loss threshold. Your insurance carrier will be in "fix" mode on these vehicles almost 100% of the time and there is very little probability that you can convince them to total your vehicle.

DamageMAX wants your NTL! We specialize in NTL's - IT'S WHAT WE DO! Make the right move and call DamageMAX now for a free price quote on your Non-Total Loss vehicle. We buy any car, anywhere.

Please visit www.damagemax.com or call 888-629-2137 for a free price quote.


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